SPLASH 2011
Fri 21 - Thu 27 October 2011 Portland, Oregon, United States

OOPSLA is an annual conference covering topics related to object-oriented programming systems, languages and applications. Like other conferences, OOPSLA offers various tracks and many simultaneous sessions, and thus has a different meaning to different people. It is an academic conference, and draws doctoral students who present peer-reviewed papers. It also draws a number of non-academic attendees, many of whom present experience reports and conduct panels, workshops and tutorials.

Call for Papers

OOPSLA 2011 solicits research papers that present new research, report novel technical results, advance the state of the art, or discuss experience or experimentation. The scope of OOPSLA includes all aspects of programming languages and software engineering, broadly construed.

Papers may address any aspect of software development, including requirements, modeling, prototyping, design, implementation, generation, analysis, verification, testing, evaluation, project cancellation, maintenance, reuse, regeneration, replacement, and retirement of software systems. Papers on tools (such as new programming languages, dynamic or static program analyses, compilers, and garbage collectors) or techniques (such as new programming methodologies, type systems, design processes, code organization approaches, and management techniques) designed to reduce the time, effort, and/or cost of software systems are particularly welcome.

Submission Summary
Due on: April 08, 2011
Author Response Opens: May 26, 2011
Author Response Closes: May 27, 2011
Notifications: June 13, 2011
Camera-ready copy due: August 17, 2011
Format: ACM Proceedings format
Submit to: http://cyberchairpro.acm.org/oopslapapers/submit/
Contact: Kathleen S Fisher (chair)

Selection Process

OOPSLA particularly encourages the submission of papers that diverge from the dominant trajectory of the field or challenge the existing value system. The program committee will consider the following criteria when evaluating submitted papers:

  • Novelty: The paper presents new ideas and/or results and places these ideas and results appropriately within the context established by previous research in the field.
  • Interest: The results in the paper are interesting, intriguing, or provocative. The paper challenges or changes informed opinion about what is possible, true, or likely.
  • Evidence: The paper presents evidence supporting its claims. Examples of evidence include formalizations and proofs, implemented systems, experimental results, statistical analyses, case studies, and anecdotes.
  • Clarity: The paper presents its claims and results clearly.

Submission

SIGPLAN Proceedings Format, 10 point font. Note that by default the SIGPLAN Proceedings Format produces papers in 9 point font. If you are formatting your paper using Latex, you will need to set the 10pt option in the \documentclass command. If you are formatting your paper using Word, you may wish to use the provided Word template that provides support for this font size. Please include page numbers in your submission. Setting the preprint option in the \documentclass command generates page numbers. Please also ensure that your submission is legible when printed on a black and white printer. In particular, please check that colors remain distinct and font sizes are legible. There is no page limit on submitted papers. It is, however, the responsibility of the authors to keep the reviewers interested and motivated to read the paper. Reviewers are under no obligation to read all or even a substantial portion of a paper if they do not find the initial part of the paper interesting. The committee will not accept a paper if it is not clear to the committee that the paper will fit in the OOPSLA 2011 proceedings, which will limit accepted papers to 20 pages. OOPSLA 2011 submissions must conform to both the ACM Policy on Prior Publication and Simultaneous Submissions and the SIGPLAN Republication Policy.

Accepted Papers

Title
A Simple Abstraction for Complex Concurrent Indexes
OOPSLA
DOI
A Step Towards Transparent Integration of Input-Consciousness into Dynamic Program Optimizations
OOPSLA
DOI
A Syntactic Type System for Recursive Modules
OOPSLA
DOI
A Theory of Substructural Types and Control
OOPSLA
DOI
AC: Composable Asynchronous IO for Native Languages
OOPSLA
DOI
Accentuating the Positive: Atomicity Inference and Enforcement Using Correct Executions
OOPSLA
DOI
Asynchronous Assertions
OOPSLA
DOI
Automated Construction of JavaScript Benchmarks
OOPSLA
DOI
Automatic Fine-Grain Locking using Shape Properties
OOPSLA
DOI
Backstage Java: Making a Difference in Metaprogramming
OOPSLA
DOI
Benefits and Barriers of User Evaluation in Software Engineering Research
OOPSLA
DOI
Catch Me If You Can: Performance Bug Detection in the Wild
OOPSLA
DOI
Cedalion: A Language for Language Oriented Programming
OOPSLA
DOI
Composable, Nestable, Pessimistic Atomic Statements
OOPSLA
DOI
Da Capo con Scala: Design and Analysis of a Scala Benchmark Suite for the Java Virtual Machine
OOPSLA
DOI
Data-Driven Synthesis for Object-Oriented Frameworks
OOPSLA
DOI
Declaratively Programming the Mobile Web with Mobl
OOPSLA
DOI
Delegated Isolation
OOPSLA
DOI
Efficiently Speeding up Sequential Computation through the N-Way Programming Model
OOPSLA
DOI
Enhancing locality for recursive traversals of recursive structures
OOPSLA
DOI
Exploiting Coarse-Grain Speculative Parallelism
OOPSLA
DOI
F4F: Taint Analysis of Framework-based Web Applications
OOPSLA
DOI
First-Class State Change in Plaid
OOPSLA
DOI
Flexible object layouts: enabling lightweight language extensions by intercepting slot access
OOPSLA
DOI
Flow-Sensitive Type Recovery in Linear-Log Time
OOPSLA
DOI
Freedom Before Commitment : A Lightweight Type System for Object Initialisation
OOPSLA
DOI
Gradual Typing for Generics
OOPSLA
DOI
Hawkeye: Effective Discovery of Dataflow Impediments to Parallelization
OOPSLA
DOI
Hybrid Partial Evaluation
OOPSLA
DOI
Immutable Specifications for More Concise and Precise Verification
OOPSLA
DOI
Integrated Language Definition Testing: Enabling Test-Driven Language Development
OOPSLA
DOI
JET: Exception Checking in the Java Native Interface
OOPSLA
DOI
JIT Compilation Policy for Modern Machines
OOPSLA
DOI
Kind Analysis for MATLAB
OOPSLA
DOI
Kismet: parallel speedup estimates for serial programs
OOPSLA
DOI
Null dereference verification via over-approximated weakest pre-conditions analysis
OOPSLA
DOI
Oracle Scheduling: Controlling Granularity in Implicitly Parallel Languages
OOPSLA
DOI
PREFAIL: A Programmable Tool for Multiple-Failure Injection
OOPSLA
DOI
Product Lines of Theorems
OOPSLA
DOI
Reactive Imperative Programming with Dataflow Constraints
OOPSLA
DOI
Reducing Trace Selection Footprint for Large-scale Java Applications with no Performance Loss
OOPSLA
DOI
Ribbons: a Partially Shared Memory Programming Model
OOPSLA
DOI
RoleCast: Finding Missing Security Checks When You Do Not Know What Checks Are
OOPSLA
DOI
SOS: Saving Time in Dynamic Race Detection with Stationary Analysis
OOPSLA
DOI
Safe Parallel Programming using Dynamic Dependence Hints
OOPSLA
DOI
Safe and Atomic Run-time Code Evolution and its Application to Dynamic AOP
OOPSLA
DOI
Scalable Join Patterns
OOPSLA
DOI
Self-Adjusting Stack Machines
OOPSLA
DOI
Sheriff: Precise Detection and Automatic Mitigation of False Sharing
OOPSLA
DOI
Sprint: Speculative Prefetching of Remote Data
OOPSLA
DOI
SugarJ: Library-based Syntactic Language Extensibility
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesis of First-Order Dynamic Programming Algorithms
OOPSLA
DOI
Synthesizing method sequences for high-coverage testing
OOPSLA
DOI
Testing Atomicity of Composed Concurrent Operations
OOPSLA
DOI
Tool-supported Refactoring for JavaScript
OOPSLA
DOI
Trustworthy Numerical Computation in Scala
OOPSLA
DOI
Two for the Price of One: A Model for Parallel and Incremental Computation
OOPSLA
DOI
Type-Checking Modular Multiple Dispatch with Parametric Polymorphism and Multiple Inheritance
OOPSLA
DOI
Variability-Aware Parsing in the Presence of Lexical Macros and Conditional Compilation
OOPSLA
DOI
Virtual Values for Language Extension
OOPSLA
DOI
Why Nothing Matters: The Impact of Zeroing
OOPSLA
DOI
Questions? Use the SPLASH OOPSLA contact form.